Non-state actors in climate change governance

Non-state actors, such as NGOs, businesses and indigenous peoples’ organisations, are increasingly recognized as important actors in climate change governance. As part of the research programme ‘Non-State Actors in the New Landscape of International Climate Cooperation’, the INS has examined perceptions of the roles that different categories of non-state actors play in climate change governance since 2010 (Nasiritousi, Hjerpe and Linnér 2014). Moreover, the INS asks participants in the intergovernmental negotiations about which reason for including non-state actors in international policymaking processes, if any, is favored. Several years’ worth of questionnaire data will be analysed in a forthcoming publication on the normative reasons for including non-state actors in intergovernmental meetings.




COP SIDE-EVENT PARTICIPANT PERCEPTIONS OF THE ROLES PERFORMED BY VARIOUS NON-STATE ACTORS IN CLIMATE GOVERNANCE (%)

This figure shows COP 17-18 side-event participants’ perceptions of the roles performed by seven categories of non-state actors in climate governance: Business and industry non-governmental organisations (BINGO), Environmental non-governmental organisations (ENGO), Indigenous peoples organisations (IPO), Local government and municipal authorities (LGMA), Research and independent non-governmental organisations (RINGO), Trade Unions non-governmental organisations (TUNGO), and Intergovernmental organisations (IGOs). The responses reflect the percentage of respondents who indicated a non-state actor as being most significant for each governance activity. The 10 governance activities measured are the following: Influence the international climate change agenda; propose viable solutions to climate change; provide information and expertise; influence decisions and policy-makers; raise awareness of climate change among the public; take actions on climate change mitigation; take actions on climate change adaptation; evaluate consequences of policies and measures; represent public opinion on climate change issues; and, represent marginalised voices. The results show that the non-state actors largely are niched toward different roles, with the full spectrum of governance activities being covered.



UNCSD SIDE-EVENT PARTICIPANT PERCEPTIONS OF THE ROLES PERFORMED BY VARIOUS NON-STATE ACTORS IN INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (%)

This figure shows UNCSD (Rio+20) side-event participants’ perceptions of the roles performed by seven categories of non-state actors in international collaboration on sustainable development: Business and industry non-governmental organisations (BINGO), Local government and municipal authorities (LGMA), Research and independent non-governmental organisations (RINGO), Environmental non-governmental organisations (ENGO), Other NGOs (ONGO), Youth, and Indigenous peoples organisations (IPO). The responses reflect the percentage of respondents who indicated a non-state actor as being most significant for each governance activity. The nine governance activities measured are the following: Influence the international sustainable development agenda; propose viable solutions; provide information and expertise; influence decisions and policy-makers; raise awareness of sustainable development among the public; take actions on sustainable development; evaluate consequences of policies and measures; represent public opinion on sustainable development issues; and, represent marginalised voices. Overall the data suggest that the governance profiles are the same for non-state actors dealing with sustainable development and climate change issues, with only a few differences discerned between our samples at the UNCSD and the UNFCCC COPs.



RESPONDENTS’ PREFERENCES FOR REASONS FOR INCLUSION OF NON-STATE ACTORS IN INTERNATIONAL POLICY-MAKING PROCESSES AT COP-17 AND COP-18, (%)

This table contains the percentages of the respondents who stated a preference for particular arguments for the inclusion of non-state actors in international policy-making on climate change at COP-17 and COP-18. SE refers to side-event sample. This data is currently being analysed and will be presented in a publication on the normative arguments for including non-state actors in intergovernmental negotiations.



RESPONDENTS’ PREFERENCES FOR REASONS FOR INCLUSION OF NON-STATE ACTORS IN INTERNATIONAL POLICY-MAKING PROCESSES AT RIO+20, (%)

Rio NSA inclusion

Rio NSA inclusion
This table shows side-event participants’ preferences for reasons for inclusion of non-state actors in international policy-making processes at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro 2012, %.